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Stanisław Przybyszewski - Learn about how Satan has a vagina on the end of his penis, and how people in the fifteenth century used to dress like the Devil to honor him

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Stanisław Przybyszewski, The Synagogue of Satan, Trans. by Joe Bandel, Bandel Books,2011. [1898.]

read it at Google Books


Originally published in the German language in 1898 by author Stanislaw PPrzybyszewski this book describes the origins and development of modern Satanism and its roots in gnostic Christianity and the reaction against the Catholic Church and its persecutions. Translated by Joe E. Bandel. This is one of the few well researched books on this subject and draws from many early historical resources. It is one of the best books on this subject.    


This is a classic study of the phenomenon of European Satanism. It is really almost a prose-poem to the rebellious spirit of fin-de-siecle Europe. The author himself is one of the best-known exponents of the Romantic school of late 19th and early 20th century Satanism. His work was also used as the basis of Hanns Heinz Ewers' famous lectures entitled "The Religion of Satan." Finally this much-storied "almost l…

Rita Bullwinkel - “I was the type of man who got his ears cleaned,” “People kept dying and I was made to sleep in their beds,” “There was a period of my life in which my primary source of income came from being a piece of furniture”

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Rita Bullwinkel, Belly Up,A Strange Object, 2018.




excerpt
http://ritabullwinkel.com/
story Black Tongue
story In the South the Sand Winds are Our Greatest Enemy


BELLY UP is a story collection that contains ghosts, mediums, a lover obsessed with the sound of harps tuning, teenage girls who believe they are actually plants, gulag prisoners who outsmart a terrible warden, and carnivorous churches. Throughout these grotesque and tender stories, characters question the bodies they've been given and what their bodies require to be sustained.



"These stunning stories take place in the spaces between ordinary objects and events. They are mysterious, strange, and fearlessly funny in their expression of human isolation, and they contain the existential surprises of great literature. BELLY UP is a powerful debut by an unusually gifted writer."--Lorrie Moore



"At the intersection of the surreal and the real, Rita Bullwinkel has carved out a unique space in which the mundane and the…

Emily Holmes Coleman portrays the post-partum psychosis of Marthe Gail, who after giving birth to her son, is committed to an insane asylum. Believing herself to be God, she maneuvers through an institutional world that is both sad and terrifying

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Emily Holmes Coleman, The Shutter of Snow, The Viking Press, 1930.
excerpt


After bearing her first child, Marthe Gail has a nervous breakdown and begins to believe that she is Jesus Christ returned to earth as a woman.


In a prose form as startling as its content, The Shutter of Snow portrays the post-partum psychosis of Marthe Gail, who after giving birth to her son, is committed to an insane asylum. Believing herself to be God, she maneuvers through an institutional world that is both sad and terrifying, echoing the worlds of One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest and The Snake Pit.
Based upon the author’s own experience after the birth of her son in 1924, The Shutter of Snow retains all the energy it had when first published in 1930.




Alone in her room at night she stood and pressed her face against the window.  It was the end of March and turned cold again.  And all the thumbs of ice began to whirl in shaking circles, keeping with the wind.  I shall have snow on my glassy fingers, and a shutt…

A Quantum City - We follow the fictional narrative figure, Orlando, beginning in 320 BC, on his odyssey through the Western world up to the present time.

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A Quantum City, Ed. by Vera Bühlmann and Ludger Hovestadt, Birkhäuser, 2015.


read it at Google Books


We know the specific strengths of various cities, are aware of their ranking, are able to discuss their density and growth. But what do all cities have in common, what do we know about the "lowest common denominator"?
The "city as a species," the "primal genetic material of the city" this is the subject of A Quantum City. This colossal work is a love letter to the city and intellectual culture.
We follow the fictional narrative figure, Orlando, beginning in 320 BC, on his odyssey through the Western world up to the present time. The book is divided into four interrelated chapters and can be read page by page in a discursive manner, however randomly browsing through the book also offers new and multi-faceted interpretations. Great intellectual achievements are compared with obscure and mundane events. A Quantum City offers an inspiring view of the city that …